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User's Guide: "#" in filesystems names is bad

Sometimes MS-Windows users try to use filesystem names which include
the "#" character.  That's generally unwise, since it begins Tcl
comments.

Signed-off-by: David Brownell <dbrownell@users.sourceforge.net>
tags/v0.4.0-rc2
David Brownell 11 years ago
parent
commit
527e073bba
1 changed files with 14 additions and 6 deletions
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    -6
      doc/openocd.texi

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doc/openocd.texi View File

@@ -539,6 +539,11 @@ Configuration files and scripts are searched for in
@end enumerate
The first found file with a matching file name will be used.

@quotation Note
Don't try to use configuration script names or paths which
include the "#" character. That character begins Tcl comments.
@end quotation

@section Simple setup, no customization

In the best case, you can use two scripts from one of the script
@@ -7633,12 +7638,15 @@ in the same basic way.
@* Example: @b{ source [find FILENAME] }
@*Remember the parsing rules
@enumerate
@item The FIND command is in square brackets.
@* The FIND command is executed with the parameter FILENAME. It should
find the full path to the named file. The RESULT is a string, which is
substituted on the orginal command line.
@item The command source is executed with the resulting filename.
@* SOURCE reads a file and executes as a script.
@item The @command{find} command is in square brackets,
and is executed with the parameter FILENAME. It should find and return
the full path to a file with that name; it uses an internal search path.
The RESULT is a string, which is substituted into the command line in
place of the bracketed @command{find} command.
(Don't try to use a FILENAME which includes the "#" character.
That character begins Tcl comments.)
@item The @command{source} command is executed with the resulting filename;
it reads a file and executes as a script.
@end enumerate
@subsection format command
@b{Where:} Generally occurs in numerous places.


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